The world of fungi.

A stark contrast to where I was a week ago.

A good friend of mine, Peter McCarthy, back in the UK, said that he had recently gone on to a supplement called Lion’s Mane. It is a supplement for keeping the cognition working and maintaining good brain function. Peter also mentioned a film called Fantastic Fungi that was available on Netflix.

At home we have Netflix and we watched the film. It was incredible, almost beyond words.

If you want to watch the official trailer then here it is:

The film is about the power of Mycelium. Here is an extract from Fungi Perfecti:

The activities of mycelium help heal and steer ecosystems on their evolutionary path, acting as a recycling mechanism to nourish other members of the ecological communities. By cycling nutrients through the food chain, mycelial networks benefit the soil and allow surrounding networks of plants and animals to survive and thrive. 

Increasingly known as the “wood wide web”, mycelium can be found underfoot with nearly every footstep on a lawn, field, or forest floor. It has been concluded that as much as 90% of land plants are in a mutually beneficial relationship with mycelial networks. Without fungi – without mycelium – all ecosystems would fail.

Mycelium and mycological applications have enormous potential to benefit the health of both people and planet. We are committed to continuing our research efforts to find new and innovative ways to build bridges between mycological applications to both human and planetary health.

We can think of it in a way of finding the mother tree.

The film speaks of protecting the old-growth forest trees. So if you have old-growth trees nearby, do everything in your power to protect them.

Here is a report including a video on Suzanne Simard’s New Book.

Forest researcher and university professor Dr. Suzanne Simard has spent years studying trees. Her research led to the discovery that the forest’s plants and trees have an underground communication system, with trees and fungi cooperating. Her Ted talk brought her work to a larger audience, while her 200 articles in peer-reviewed journals shared her research findings with the larger science community. Now, she is releasing her first book Finding the Mother Tree, published by Penguin Random House.

This is not a book about how we can save the trees. This is a book about how the trees might save us’.

16 thoughts on “The world of fungi.

      1. Then I will recommend a book to you, no attachment as to whether you read it or not: Finding the Mother Tree by Suzanne Simard. Captivating! She was one of the first scientists to make a connection between mycelia and the health of the forest.

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      1. Presumably, you were in awe of the knowledge in that video as we were? Funnily, I have just come in from building a barrier to the old ponies’ field. Our two horses had nearly pushed the old gate completely over. It has taken me several hours to finish and then I managed to scoop up in the tractor several cut limbs of madrone. They had been there for several years and when I lifted the logs up from the ground I saw the soil and the fungi underneath in a new light!

        Liked by 1 person

  1. Ugh. Have I mentioned lately how ‘technological progress’ really winds me up? There are clearly supposed to be two video clips embedded in this post, yet (in the latest version of Firefox) they don’t show. I checked Chrome, and, yep, there they are. You could argue that I should switch to Chrome; but I would argue that Chrome is owned by Google which is owned by Alphabet… and, call me paranoid, but I think there’s a reason that Google demoted their “Don’t be evil” motto.

    Bit of a sidetrack. Sorry about that.

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