Wisdom, nature and philosophy.

The hidden gifts of nature.

I have been a follower of Alex Jones’ blog The Liberated Way for many months; possibly much longer. Frequently, I republish one of Alex’s posts here.

Nearly six months ago, I read a lovely essay of his and made a mental note to republish that in the next few days.  Then the world overtook me and now April 30th, when Alex published this piece, has become September 8th!

Yet it hasn’t lost a heartbeat of meaning.

Read on and you will agree.

ooOOoo

The hidden gifts of nature.

The western education system ignores nature.

Nature is all around us with its gifts of philosophy, wisdom and creativity; qualities the West devalues at its loss.
Nature is all around us with its gifts of philosophy, wisdom and creativity; qualities the West devalues at its loss.

The holidays are over in the UK, the students return to school, some to their exams. I reflect upon the sad treatment of creativity, wisdom, nature and natural philosophy in education, and in Western society as a whole, treated as worthless and unworthy of consideration.

On most days I walk past the former home of William Gilbert, some consider the father of electricity and magnetism. Born to a wealthy merchant family in my town of Colchester, Gilbert invested his personal wealth in an extensive study of magnetism with view to assisting the explorers of the Elizabethan age when Britain was building an empire in a period of great prosperity and confidence. Gilbert invented the term electricity. Gilbert wrote De Magnete, considered possibly the first work using the scientific method. In addition to being a scientist, a doctor to Elizabeth I, Gilbert was also a natural philosopher who used the empirical method of observation, demonstration and experience of nature to form his theories.

Each day I watch and interact with nature, like Gilbert I am a natural philosopher, and this forms the basis of my business ideas, my scientific understanding and my personal philosophies. Rather than a worthless study nature opens the door to the philosophy of the understanding of self, the world, and the relationship of self to the world. Wisdom is born of action and experience, the interactions with nature gives birth to wisdom. Nature encourages people to do new things in new ways, so rerouting electric signals in the brain causing new connections to form of creativity. The philosophy emerges from nature by causing the mind to question, observe and experiment, the basis of science and success in any discipline.

ooOOoo

Colchester, in the English county of Essex, goes way back to Roman times when the town was called Camulodunon (which was latinised as Camulodunum). That name is believed to date back to the Celtic fortress of “Camulodunon”, meaning Stronghold of Camulos. It served as the first capital of Roman Britain making a claim to be the oldest town in Britain.

It is where Alex Jones lives, the author of The Liberated Way, and where during the 1980’s I ran a business under the name of Dataview Ltd.  In fact, the business was located in a very old, listed building known as The Portreeve’s House.  It was at the bottom of town near Hythe Quay on the River Colne and the name “Portreeve” is old English for harbour master, i.e. it was originally the harbour master’s house.

The timber-framed building at 1–2 East Bay, Colchester, known as the Portreeve’s House (TM00552525), is situated on the main eastern approach to the town centre. The building is on the junction of Brook Street and East Bay (FIG. 1) and is 375 metres east of the former position of East Gate and 150 metres west of East Bridge, the river Colne and East Mill.
The timber-framed building at 1–2 East Bay, Colchester, known as the Portreeve’s House is situated on the main eastern approach to the town centre. The building is on the junction of Brook Street and East Bay and is 375 metres east of the former position of East Gate and 150 metres west of East Bridge, the river Colne and East Mill.  The building is believed to date back to the 16th Century.

All seems a long way from Southern Oregon!

13 thoughts on “Wisdom, nature and philosophy.

  1. Hi Paul, I often pass Portreeve’s House, so now I shall be reminded of you when I next pass it. This part of Colchester was a site of a savage fight between the Royalists and the Parliamentarians during the English Civil War when the Royalists tried to reopen a supply line during the siege of Colchester. I would be unsurprised that Portreeves House was used by soldiers of either side during the battle. The Siege House further down the road across the river is full of holes from the musket ball shots.

    Colchester is full of history, and always a useful source of material to blog about 🙂

    Thanks for reblogging my blog post.

    1. You are more than welcome. When I used to work late in Portreeve’s House, after all the others had gone for the day, I frequently imagined sensing the spirits of earlier inhabitants. Always seemed to have an air of peace and tranquillity around the place.

      How is the building being used today?

      1. There has been a lot of change at the groundfloor level with new windows installed, and the door at side is gone. Until last year there was a house letting agency located there; now a telecommunications company works there. They sometimes host posters for some creative events I promote in their window.

  2. There is so much to learn from nature’s elegant design. I agree some essentials are lost in our western educational system. One of that is a appreciation of what nature can teach us. Great post. Thanks.

    I have followed The Liberated Way for a while now. Very worth the mention.

  3. They say the world is a small place, 🙂 I love Alex’s Blog also Paul.. and have yet to do a Mass Catch up there too… I have missed so many good posts while I have been doing my own thing these past few weeks.. 🙂

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