Tag: Three Rivers Hospital

Visiting the Vet – Ruby’s Urine Culture

At last we have the details.

On September 1st, I published an update on Ruby’s condition with regard to her UTI. This was because Ruby had had a re-occurrence of blood in her urine. Dr. Jim took an xray and also wanted Ruby’s urine sent across to Three Rivers Hospital for a culture. As I explained in that post, using information found online:

A urine culture is a test to find germs (such as bacteria) in the urine that can cause an infection. Urine in the bladder is normally sterile. This means it does not contain any bacteria or other organisms (such as fungi). But bacteria can enter the urethra and cause a urinary tract infection (UTI).

A sample of urine is added to a substance that promotes the growth of germs. If no germs grow, the culture is negative. If germs grow, the culture is positive. The type of germ may be identified using a microscope or chemical tests. Sometimes other tests are done to find the right medicine for treating the infection. This is called sensitivity testing.

Late on Tuesday afternoon, the Clinic rang to say that the full results were in.

So yesterday morning, the air still heavy with the smoke from the forest fires, we called in to Lincoln Road.

The report from Rogue Regional Medical Center, as in Three Rivers Hospital, offered the following:

VET URINE CULTURE

SPECIMEN SOURCE: URINE

COMMENTS TO MICRO: URINE

CULTURE RESULTS: 20,000 CFU/ML PROTEUS MIRABILIS

REPORT STATUS: FINAL 09/02/2017

(My emphasis)

That translated into Ruby’s medicine being changed from her present course of Amoxicillin antibiotic to Enrofloxacin (Two 136 mg tablets by mouth every 24 hours for 10 days.)

A quick web search produced this (in part):

Enrofloxacin (ENR) is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic sold by the Bayer Corporation under the trade name Baytril. Enrofloxacin is currently approved by the FDA for the treatment of individual pets and domestic animals in the United States.

Jeannie reading the details on the label.

Onwards and upwards!

Roads to recovery.

For Casey and Yours Truly!

At 1pm yesterday, I had an appointment with the medical assistant at the Department of Urology, Three Rivers Hospital, in Grants Pass, following my ten days of ‘wearing’ a catheter.  The good news was that the catheter was removed (and I must now remember I can’t pee anytime I like!).

The more sobering news was that for at least until the end of March, I must not engage in any lifting, pulling or pushing, or any exercise that would run the risk of another bleeding episode. I have an appointment with Dr. Mayer, the urologist, at the end of March and really want to be signed off as fully fit at that time.

So far: so good!

For dear, sweet Casey he is facing a very long haul. Dr. Jim, our vet neighbour and close friend, recommended that Casey start taking a steroid and he is now on Prednisone.

p1160892This has the effect of making Casey very lethargic. No bad thing because the only chance of his spinal disc and pad healing up is that he takes very little exercise. In the picture above you can see Casey avoids lifting his head up when he looks at you.

p1160889Jean has also paced Casey’s food bowl on a small stool because Casey found it painful to lower his mouth down to floor level.

Dr. Jim says that there is a very good chance that Casey will heal himself but that we are all looking at quite a few weeks.

So for Casey and me we sincerely hope that the end of March has us both firmly down that road to full recovery.

Paloma cruising past a resting Casey!
Paloma cruising past a resting Casey!

This is a bloody nuisance!

May be out of commission for a few days?

Last December 21st I underwent an outpatient operation for the removal of growth around my prostate. A fairly normal operation for a gent of my age (72).

l was told that it would take about 8 weeks for everything to heal.

Anyway, this morning I noticed a significant amount of blood in my urine and Jean and I went to our local Three Rivers hospital in Grants Pass. I was admitted to ER.

I was sorted out and nothing serious immediately found although the cause of the bleeding was not identified. However a blood test did not find any infection or anything scary. I was recommended to go home.

The blood in urine is called Hematuria and the doctor inserted a Foley catheter to drain the blood & urine from my bladder.

The catheter and the drainage bag will remain attached to me until I have an appointment with the Urologist early next week. I have to keep pretty still until then plus sitting on a normal chair is painful at the moment. I’m laying back on the bed using my tablet to write this.

Sorry, dear people, but that’s how it is just now.

oooo

Update as at 10:30 PST Sunday, 12th

Around 10:30PM last night I awoke with quite a severe pain in my bladder. My body was telling me to hot-foot it back to the Emergency Ward at Three Rivers in Grants Pass. This was where we had gone earlier in the day.

Jean doesn’t drive at night but it was a straightforward journey and I was seen very quickly by the ER staff (Micha, Ann and Trevor: you were all brilliant!) I was told that my decision to drive into ER was spot on. (Trevor at a later point said that listening to our body is so important and that they saw far too many individuals who had let whatever the problem was run on far too long before seeking medical help.)

Micha quickly determined that a blood clot had blocked the catheter hence my inability to pass urine/blood and the rapid build up of pain. Gently syringing the catheter with a saline solution released a huge number of clots; to my obvious relief.

Apparently, the urologist on call was telephoned and he recommended the removal of the existing catheter to then be replaced with a larger catheter (ouch!)  that would handle blood clots more efficiently.

Then for approximately an hour I was irrigated so as to completely flush out the remaining clots.

It was 50:50 as to whether I was to be admitted to a ward but again the advice of the on-call urologist was that so long as my body continued to drain blood/urine into the catheter drainage bag then it was OK for me to return home.

I arrived home at 4:30am!

So here we are approximately six hours later and I am still bleeding but, touch wood, no sign of clots and the draining into the bag is still running.

P.S. I have offered these details just in case someone else finds them helpful!

UPDATE 14:15 Tuesday, 14th.

On the afternoon of the 11th I took an afternoon nap having had practically no sleep the previous night.

Around 2pm I awoke with a pain that told me I probably had another blood clot and again said to Jean that I was going to take myself back into the ER department.

Once admitted to ER they made the decision that my bleeding was such that I should be admitted to the General Ward in the hospital. I ended up on Floor E, room 361.

I was then hooked up to a saline drip and stayed that way until 4am this morning, Tuesday 14th! For it took that long for the blood clots to finally stop surfacing and my urine to start looking a normal yellow colour.

From 4am I was then just draining via the Foley catheter and, thank goodness, I continued draining reliably, with no further bleeding or clotting, right through to 11:30 when Dr. Newcomb, the duty doctor, announced that I was fit to return home!

I will write more as soon as I catch up with stuff.

Exit one polyp!

It’s your fault this is being published! 😉

I couldn’t resist showing my appreciation for the interest and best wishes from so many of you regarding the removal of my polyp.

Jean and I arrived at Three Rivers Hospital locally in Grants Pass a little before 10am and were quickly admitted to the pre-op room. Once I had been connected to all the various devices it was but a short wait before Dr. Nelson came in to check that all was ready for the procedure.

Amazingly, I was then back in the pre-op room after the 45-minute procedure had been carried out by 11:40am. Dr. Nelson then briefed me that everything had gone well and passed me the photos below.

I couldn’t resist sharing the photographs showing the polyp before removal on the left-hand side and the ‘crater on the moon’, as Dr. Nelson described, on the right-hand side it where the polyp once was!

scan-16The photograph on the right was taken before it was sewn over to prevent any subsequent infection.

Once again, thanks for all your best wishes. As Marina and Sue and others implied it was a very straightforward operation.

Distracted from Oregon!

Apologies for the fact that the next few days are going to be challenging, from a blogging point-of-view.

A fraction over a month ago I introduced a post called Returning To Happy Dogs where I said:

Yesterday, I was at our local Three Rivers Hospital having a colonoscopy. The procedure was a breeze but I wouldn’t recommend the bowel prep one has to take before the procedure!😦

When the results came through I was informed that the surgeon, Dr. Nelson, had found a fairly large polyp in my colon. The polyp was about 4 cms long but, thankfully, the biopsy taken came back negative – there was no sign of bowel cancer! Joy of joys!

But tomorrow I am returning to Three Rivers Hospital early in the morning so that Dr. Nelson and his team may remove the polyp. I am uncertain as to how quickly I will be “back on my feet”.

Then on Saturday and Sunday PetSmart down in Medford, about an hour South of us here in Merlin, are holding a major cat and dog adoption event. Jean and I have been invited to attend in association with a book signing for my book as a large part of my sale proceeds are going to a local animal rescue society.

Thus for Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday I am going to be republishing posts from earlier times.

I made the decision to republish posts from a few years back on the assumption, and hope, that many of you dear people that have signed up to follow these scribbles will not have previously read them. Plus, I am unsure how well connected I will be in terms of replying to comments.

Many thanks!