A new word for love – Kabang!

The story of the Philippine dog, Kabang.

This has been very widely reported but nevertheless it’s a great story about the devotion of dogs to humans, and in return, the way that so many people recognised the need for help for the badly injured dog.

Readers will recall that the dog, Kabang, suffered massive injuries back in December 2011 when she jumped into the path of a motorcycle, stopping it from running over her owner’s daughter and niece in Zamboanga, a city in the Southern Philippines.

Here’s a video that was published back in October last year that explores the circumstances of the dog’s actions and the public’s response.

“A dog who became an international cause celebre after her snout was sliced off saving two young girls in the Philippines was examined by veterinarians Thursday at UC Davis, a milestone event in a remarkable humanitarian effort to help a canine heroine.

The mixed-breed dog, named Kabang, became an unlikely star in the Philippines after she reportedly threw herself into the path of a speeding motorcycle just as it was about to hit two young girls crossing a roadway in Zamboanga City.

The lunge, by all accounts, saved the lives of the daughter and niece of Kabang’s owner, but cost the dog her snout and upper jaw, which was sheared off when she got tangled in the motorcycle’s spokes. The gruesome injury puts her in grave danger of developing an infection. At minimum, the gaping wound must be closed, a delicate procedure that is beyond the capability of veterinarians in the Philippines.”* Would you prolong your dog’s life even if it were that costly? Ana Kasparian, John Iadarola, and Jayar Jackson break it down.

Then on June 3rd, CBS Sacramento News reported:

The clinicians, staff and caregivers that treated and cared for Kabang, the snoutless mutt from the Philippines credited with saving the lives of two young girls last year. Kabang has been treated and will be heading back to the Philippines in the near future. Kabang arrived at the UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital on October 11, 2012 after a long journey from her native Philippines. She presented with pre-existing health conditions that significantly delayed her dental and facial surgeries. As the treatments for those conditions were successfully completed in February 2013, she proceeded on to her dental and facial surgeries in March 2013. Kabang came through both of those surgeries successfully and is currently recovering under the watchful eye of the UC Davis VMTH faculty and staff. Photo by Don Preisler/UCDavis © 2013 UC Regents
The clinicians, staff and caregivers that treated and cared for Kabang, the snoutless mutt from the Philippines credited with saving the lives of two young girls last year. Kabang has been treated and will be heading back to the Philippines in the near future.
Kabang arrived at the UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital on October 11, 2012 after a long journey from her native Philippines. She presented with pre-existing health conditions that significantly delayed her dental and facial surgeries. As the treatments for those conditions were successfully completed in February 2013, she proceeded on to her dental and facial surgeries in March 2013. Kabang came through both of those surgeries successfully and is currently recovering under the watchful eye of the UC Davis VMTH faculty and staff.
Photo by Don Preisler/UCDavis
© 2013 UC Regents

DAVIS (CBS13) – Kabang, the Philippine dog that suffered a severely injured snout and upper-jaw while saving two girls from being hit by a motorcycle, has been released from the hospital.

The dog was brought to the veterinary medicine teaching hospital at UC Davis in October 2012 to be treated for the injury that left her with a gaping wound where her snout had been. But veterinarians found she had heartworm disease and a type of infectious cancer. A team of UC Davis veterinarians specializing in oncology; infectious diseases; dental, oral and soft-tissue surgery; internal medicine; and outpatient care was assembled to treat Kabang, according to the UC Davis News Service.

“We were able to treat all of the complications that arose with the best specialists available,” Verstraete said Professor Frank Verstraete, chief of the hospital’s dentistry and oral surgery service.

Finally, a video of Kabang’s return home.

6 thoughts on “A new word for love – Kabang!

  1. Who is to care for the dog in the phillipines…..makes me crazy it is going back to a place where she had multiple health issues from lack of care????

    Like

    1. Hi Patsy, thanks for your comment, and welcome to this place. With all the wonderful publicity surrounding Kabang I would doubt very much that she will want for care ever again.

      Like

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