Tag: Wild deer

Musings from a 77 year old!

Where did it all go? That is: Life! Or more accurately my life.

I was born in Acton, London before the end of WWII. I am in my 77th year. Life these days seems to be more or less a paradox.

There are so many challenges at the moment. Not just in the USA nor in the UK but globally. We love where we live here in rural Merlin but we are already in the third year of below normal rainfall.

A view of the sunrise from taken from our property.

The contradictions in terms of our life locally and the global scene are huge. This is all leading to me quoting extracts from a recent George Monbiot article. The article starts by saying: “On both sides of the Atlantic, powerful interests seem determined to trigger the collapse of life on Earth. Why?

Sexton Mountain last winter. Again photo taken from our property.

A little later on in Geo. Monbiot’s article, he writes: “When I began work as an environmental journalist in 1985, I knew I would struggle against people with a financial interest in destructive practices. But I never imagined that we would one day confront what appears to be an ideological commitment to destroying life on Earth. The UK government and the US supreme court look as if they are willing the destruction of our life support systems.

Because it does seem as though the political leaders are not taking the future of the planet seriously. As Patrice Ayme concluded recently in a remark to that post: “Biden ought to declare a climate emergency.” But it won’t happen!

(Well I may stand corrected. Yesterday it was widely reported, and I chose Renewable Energy: “The clean energy industry celebrated a moment on August 7 that would have seemed impossible just a few weeks earlier: The Senate passed a budget measure that includes the largest investments in clean energy and climate change in U.S. history.“)

Every morning when I go down to feed our two ex-rescue horses I also feed the wild deer. I have been doing it for many years. Long enough that a young buck has turned into an adult and comes within a few feet of me.

It never ceases to delight.

The contradiction between me going every morning down to the stable area and feeding the horses and the wild deer, and the outcome for the planet is beyond words. In a very real way it is incomprehensible.

Again, Geo. Monbiot writes: “All this might seem incomprehensible. Why would anyone want to trash the living world? Surely even billionaires want a habitable and beautiful planet? Don’t they like snorkelling on coral reefs, salmon fishing in pristine rivers, skiing on snowy mountains? We suffer from a deep incomprehension of why such people act as they do. We fail to distinguish preferences from interests, and interests from power. It is hard for those of us who have no desire for power over others to understand people who do. So we are baffled by the decisions they make, and attribute them to other, improbable causes. Because we do not understand them, we are the more easily manipulated.”

Under our apple tree!

It really is a paradox! And who knows the outcome. All I can say is that, despite me being the age I am, I would not want to be any younger and aware that soon one would be facing the global changes full on.

Stacked cumulus clouds to the North-East.

More words from Geo. Monbiot: “Since 1985, I’ve been told we don’t have time to change the system: we should concentrate only on single issues. But we’ve never had time not to change the system. In fact, because of the way in which social attitudes can suddenly tip, system change can happen much faster than incrementalism. Until we change our political systems, making it impossible for the rich to buy the decisions they want, we will lose not only individual cases. We will lose everything.”

I have no idea of the global changes that are afoot and how they will affect us in Merlin. Indeed, I have no idea how long I have to live.

Jean and I met in December, 2007. We met in Mexico but Jean was also born in London, just a few years after me. How’s that for chance!

Jean’s American husband had died in 2005. She was rescuing dogs off the streets, sorting them out, and finding homes for them, mainly in Arizona.

Jean and me in San Carlos, Mexico.

I went out to Mexico with Pharaoh in 2008. With a one-way ticket!

Pharaoh digging in the sand in Mexico.

However of one thing I am sure. Since that meeting in December, 2007 life has been as good as it comes. I have never been happier.

What a contradiction!

Picture Parade One Hundred and Sixty-Four

Thought today’s picture parade should carry an Autumnal theme!

All these photographs of the deer, wild turkeys and the Harvest Moon were taken at home last Thursday. (NB: The turkeys were born on our property this last Spring.)

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I sincerely hope that wherever you are in the world, assuming the Northern Hemisphere, you are having an evocative and peaceful Autumn, or Fall in American speak! (Barb – or Spring in ‘Down Under’ speak!)

Picture Parade One Hundred and Fifty-Eight

Returning to the photographs of the deer that come to our property.

Feeding the deer has been featured before on Learning from Dogs but I just wanted to devote today and next Sunday to nothing more sophisticated than photographs; all of them taken here at home.

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Photograph taken mid-January, 2014

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Mother deer reaches down to feed; the tray is about three feet in front of Jean and me.
A deer reaches down to feed; the tray is about three feet in front of Jean and me. (October, 2014)

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Jean reaches forward and gently draws the tray closer to us. Mother deer continues to feed.
Jean reaches forward and gently draws the tray closer to us. The deer continues to feed. (October, 2014)

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Then, unbelievably, the wild deer continues feeding as Jean fondles the deer's ear.
Then, unbelievably, the wild deer continues feeding as Jean fondles the deer’s head and neck. (October, 2014)

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The trust between the deer and Jean then enabled the deer to feed from Jean's hand.
The trust between the deer and Jean then enabled the deer to feed from Jean’s hand. (October, 2014)

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There was a rustle in the leaves some twenty feet away and we saw the fawn watching her mother feeding on the cob. Jean pushed the tray away, just by a few feet, and the fawn came right up to her mother.
Then there was a rustle in the leaves some twenty feet away and we saw the fawn watching her mother feeding on the cob. Jean and I backed away, just by a few feet, and the fawn came right up to her mother. (October, 2014)

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The culmination of the most magical of experiences: mother deer and her fawn eating together some three feet in front of us.
The culmination of the most magical of experiences: mother deer and her fawn eating together some three feet in front of us. (October, 2014)

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Three stags. (July, 2016)
Three stags. (July, 2016)

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Doris returns after a brief absence.
Doris returns after a brief absence. (July, 2016)

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"Where's my breakfast, Mr. Paul?"
“Where’s my breakfast, Mr. Paul?” (July, 2016)

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The photographs continue next Sunday.

Reaching out to the wilderness.

This is where our solace is.

Jean and I are members of the Oregon Wild organisation. As their home page states:

Oregon Wild supporters help us protect and restore our wildlands, wildlife, and waters as an enduring legacy for future generations.

In their last Newsletter (Volume 43, Number 2) there was a heart-breaking item about the killing of a wild wolf. I asked them if I might have permission to republish that and it was promptly granted.

Then early yesterday morning, around 7am, the early morning sunlight picked up two deer, a young stag and a doe, who had come to feed on the molasses cob that we put out twice a day.

I grabbed my camera and went quietly out to where they were feeding. Although both creatures were familiar to Jean and me, and they are not too uncomfortable with us out there putting cob down, this time my different behaviour and especially the cold, dark ‘eye’ of the camera lens made the two deer pretty twitchy.

So I’m putting off the sad eulogy of the shot wolf until tomorrow and offering up the magic of being trusted by these beautiful creatures.

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The young stag in the foreground and the doe feeding on the cob both without being freaked out by my presence.

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But two further steps towards them by yours truly had them instantly watching me very closely.

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Now I’m on the verge of getting too close.

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One last photograph grabbed before they disappear into the forest. But what a magnificent, beautiful animal is that young stag!

See you tomorrow and the sad story of wolf OR-4

The poetry of nature

A repeat of a post from last October.

A few days ago, we had a visit from the Wilderness Campaign Coordinator from Oregon Wild. Bridget, that being her name, took the opportunity of saying ‘hi’ as a consequence of her coming down from Northern Oregon to Ashland. Bridget was giving a presentation in Ashland regarding securing more wilderness areas in Oregon; a very worthy ambition. Jean and I have supported the organisation since we moved up to Oregon.

Anyway, I offered to use Learning from Dogs to support and promote any campaigns from OW that would be of interest to LfD readers.  I sorted out some recent posts that would give Bridget and her colleagues an idea of what was published in this place and sent her the links.

One of the links that I forwarded was this post from last October.  I just wanted to share it with you all again.

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Embracing the poetry of nature.

The beauty of poetry.

In yesterday’s post, where I wrote about how Jean and I had the wonderful privilege of feeding a wild deer from our hands, I closed it with a p.s. This is what I wrote: “P.S. It is at times like this that we need poetry.  So how about it: Sue? Kim? How would you describe in poetry what Jean and I experienced?

Well, Sue, of Sue Dreamwalker, replied with a link to a poem of hers that she published back in 2012. I will say no more than republish, with permission, Sue’s beautiful words and close with one of the photographs from yesterday.

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Be at One with yourself

Be at one with the world

Be at One with Nature

And see your life unfurl

Close your eyes and imagine

The beginnings of a New Earth,

And Open your eyes to your beauty

Breathe in and give Birth.

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For you are One and part of the Whole

Not a separate Unit , but a Beautiful Soul

United within the One Divine love

And part of that cosmic hub.

Share your love along with your Light

And Rejoice in Gratitude

Use your sight

To see a world in Beauty and Grace

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You are stronger than you think you know

Spread a little Love where ever you go

Shower your peace and sprinkle your heart

Into the rivers of life send a ripple a spark

Be Calm, knowing all is well

Keep breathing in Peace for inside it dwells

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Know you are where you are meant to be

Open your eyes

Come on now See

For we are ONE and it’s time to Unite

Stop all your hating, and judging and strife

Find your heart and clear out your mind

Seek out yourself

And Wisdom you’ll find

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Let go of torments and allow the Joy in

Come on now people

It’s time to begin

Be One with yourself

Be One with the world

Be One with nature

And Let the Universe Spin

For the Spiral is turning and

Peace will Win..

© Sue Dreamwalker – 2012 All rights reserved.

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The trust between the deer and Jean then enabled the deer to feed from Jean's hand.
The trust between the deer and Jean then enabled the deer to feed from Jean’s hand.