Tag: Endangered Species Act

In praise of wolves

Three stunning photographs of wolves.

In my post yesterday, A Eulogy for OR-4, I republished a passionate and moving account by Rob Klavins of the killing of a magnificent wolf. It included these words:

He escaped kill orders and poachers. He endured at least 4 collarings and he beat the odds. There aren’t many ten year old wolves out there. Today there is one less.

OR4 was shot and killed today. And it hurts. Anyone celebrating his death, the killing of his likely pregnant partner, and two of his pups, must have a hardened heart indeed.

All I am offering for you today is the contents of a recent email that I received from the Endangered Species Coalition.

ooOOoo

Paul,

We are excited to announce the winning entries in our first-ever Wolves in the Wild photo contest! While we received many beautiful photos of gray wolves, the difficult task of choosing winning submissions was carried out with much deliberation by our panel of judges.

The Grand Prize winner is:

url
Dan Ritzman

Runner ups are:

John Long
John Long
Brenna Burke
Brenna Burke

We are enormously grateful to everyone who participated! Your photos were all amazing and I assure you that choosing a winner was a difficult task for the judges. While the contest was fun, we hope the photos will serve a very serious purpose in helping to show decision makers in the Pacific Northwest that wolves are important not only for their role in a healthy ecosystem, but as a driver of tourism and associated economic benefits.

Thank you for your commitment to disappearing wildlife and wild places.

Sincerely,

Danielle Moser
Pacific Northwest Wolf Organizer
Endangered Species Coalition

ooOOoo

Let me just repeat that key sentence from Danielle, “While the contest was fun, we hope the photos will serve a very serious purpose in helping to show decision makers in the Pacific Northwest that wolves are important not only for their role in a healthy ecosystem, but as a driver of tourism and associated economic benefits.”

Exactly!

Staying with the African Lion

Listing African Lions as an endangered species – you have until 11:59 pm Eastern Time today to so do.

african lions

Yesterday, at 08:25 Pacific Standard Time, I published a second post under the title of  “Yet another vital cause – the African Lion“.

Rather than repeat the plea to support the petition please go here and do all you can to “Save African lions from extinction by listing them as an endangered species.”  As that petition explains:

We’ve lost more than 80-90% of the world’s lion population in recent decades due to massive habitat loss, disease, trophy hunters and the exotic animal trade. Two thirds of lion trophies have ended up in the United States over the last ten years! If listed as endangered, hunters will no longer be able to bring lion trophies into the US therefore saving a large number of the lion population.This is our chance to give these iconic animals the protections they need before they disappear forever.

We only have until the end of the day on Monday, January 28th to tell the government we support endangered species protections for lions!

Please sign my petition in support of listing lions under the Endangered Species Act. Once you’ve signed, I also encourage you to leave a comment on the official proposal at https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2012/11/27/2012-28310/endangered-and-threatened-wildlife-and-plants-90-day-finding-on-a-petition-to-list-the-african-lion#table_of_contents You will find the comment area on the upper right hand of the page.

To pick up on the deadline again, from that Federal Register website one can read this:

To allow us adequate time to conduct this review, we request that we receive information on or before January 28, 2013. The deadline for submitting an electronic comment using the Federal eRulemaking Portal (see ADDRESSES section, below) is 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on this date [my emphasis].

So the deadline is as follows:

11:59 pm USA Eastern Time

10:59 pm USA Central Time

9:59 pm USA Mountain Time

8:59 pm USA Pacific Time

4:59 am on the 29th UK time

You don’t have to be resident in the USA in order to sign the petition.

Thank you, good people!
Thank you, good people!

Yet another vital cause – the African Lion

Please save the African Lion from extinction by listing them as an endangered species!

This came into my email in-box earlier this morning US Pacific time.  There is a deadline associated with the petition, hence me publishing this straight away.  While it is primarily aimed at those living in the USA, I believe that for those elsewhere there is still good to be had from supporting this urgent campaign.

First that email.

I think I’m starting to be known as “that Lion Lady”. First, I started a petition to get a restaurant in Kansas to stop serving lion meat (we won!), and then I started another to get the FDA to ban lion meat throughout the country. But I can’t help it — I do this all because lions’ very existence is at risk.

Now, I’m ecstatic: we have an unprecedented chance tosave African lions by getting them on the Endangered Species List. Listing them would not only keep lion meat off American plates but would save thousands of lions by addressing one of the biggest threats to the African lion population — trophy hunting. 

But just like restaurateurs opposed my petition to get lion meat out of a Kansas restaurant, wealthy American hunters are fighting to keep African lions off the Endangered Species List so they can continue to bring their bodies home as trophies. Our time is short — the government body in charge of the list is factoring public opinion into its decision and the public comment period ends on Monday.

In the past fifty years, the African lion population declined by as much as 90%. Many of the lion prides that do exist today are so genetically weak from being small and isolated by international borders that they can’t promise a future for African lions.

Legal trophy hunting is a major cause of African lions’ decline — and two thirds of the African lions killed by trophy hunters end up in the U.S. That’s thousands of lions!

Americans hold the key to saving the African lion. An Endangered Species listing would ban any lion parts or bodies from being imported into the U.S. — a huge deterrent to hunters who want to go on safari and bring back a trophy — as well as stop the sale of lion meat nationwide.

Click here to sign my petition, calling on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to designate the African lion as an endangered species now before its public comment period ends on Monday.

Thank you.

Cheryl Semcer (aka “The Lion Lady”!)
Hoboken, New Jersey

That petition link takes you here.  Here’s what you will read:

African lion

Petitioning Ken Salazar

Save African lions from extinction by listing them as an endangered species

Petition by Cheryl Semcer

Many people already think African lions are protected as an endangered species, but they aren’t listed under the Endangered Species Act. That means the US government doesn’t protect them, and it’s legal to import lion trophies and lion parts and to serve lion meat at restaurants here in the states.

I’ve been to Africa to volunteer with these amazing, social and family oriented animals and it worries me that they might disappear in my lifetime. But there’s hope: Right now, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is considering adding African lions to the endangered species list.

We’ve lost more than 80-90% of the world’s lion population in recent decades due to massive habitat loss, disease, trophy hunters and the exotic animal trade. Two thirds of lion trophies have ended up in the United States over the last ten years! If listed as endangered, hunters will no longer be able to bring lion trophies into the US therefore saving a large number of the lion population.This is our chance to give these iconic animals the protections they need before they disappear forever.

We only have until the end of the day on Monday, January 28th to tell the government we support endangered species protections for lions!

Please sign my petition in support of listing lions under the Endangered Species Act. Once you’ve signed, I also encourage you to leave a comment on the official proposal at https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2012/11/27/2012-28310/endangered-and-threatened-wildlife-and-plants-90-day-finding-on-a-petition-to-list-the-african-lion#table_of_contents You will find the comment area on the upper right hand of the page.

To:
Ken Salazar, Secretary of Interior
US Fish and Wildlife Service
Dear USFWS,Thank you for reviewing the status of African lions. I strongly urge you to list the African lion as “endangered” under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. (Docket No. FWS-R9-ES-2012-0025)

African lions are among the most iconic animals on the planet and I worry that they might disappear in my lifetime. I’ve read about their devastating habitat loss and threats from disease and hunters. We have lost 80%-90% of the worlds lion population in less than 50 years. It’s especially disturbing to see lion parts and lion meat sold in the United States, when this species has lost so much of its wild population in recent years.

The United States has a huge role to play, as a world leader and a major market for lions and lion parts. Please give African lions the protections they deserve and need by granting them Endangered Species Act protections.

Thank you.

Sincerely,
[Your name]

oooOOOooo

So please, please don’t delay.  Go here and support this vital petition.  While I am unable to access the link, there is a link alongside the address panel for those living outside the US.

Thank you.

UPDATE

If you go to the Federal Register link, this one, you can enter a comment via a Comment button at the top right-hand corner of the webpage.  You will be required to leave your name and address and comments are being accepted from other countries.

So as well as signing the petition, please go to that link:

https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2012/11/27/2012-28310/endangered-and-threatened-wildlife-and-plants-90-day-finding-on-a-petition-to-list-the-african-lion#table_of_contents

Grandad, tell me what polar bears were like?

Politics, oil and our natural world – tell me it’s all a bad dream!

Note

Yesterday, Thursday, I was really under the cosh in terms of finding time to write a careful and thoughtful Post for today, being involved in meetings both in the morning and afternoon, those meetings all about launching a transition town movement for Payson.

So my apologies for taking a short-cut and reproducing an item that was published on Common Dreams that, fortuitously, linked in with yesterday’s Post Moved to help?

Obama Echoes Bush, Sets Plan for Polar Bear Extinction

“President Obama’s proposal for these magnificent and imperiled animals is a gift to Big Oil”

– Common Dreams staff

The Obama Administration issued a proposed rule yesterday that disregards the effects of greenhouse gases on polar bear habitat leading one conservation group to say that the rule echoes former President George W. Bush’s plan, and that it will lead to the extinction of polar bears.

Kassie Siegel from the Center for Biological Diversity: “President Obama’s proposal for these magnificent and imperiled animals is a gift to Big Oil and an affirmation of the pro-industry policies of the Bush government. (photo: Subhankar Banerjee)

Kassie Siegel from the Center for Biological Diversity: “President Obama’s proposal for these magnificent and imperiled animals is a gift to Big Oil and an affirmation of the pro-industry policies of the Bush government. (photo: Subhankar Banerjee)Noting that polar bears are only on the endangered species list precisely because of loss of habitat caused by greenhouse gases generated from activities outside the Arctic, the proposed rule excluding activities outside the range of polar bears from regulations will lead to the bears’ demise.

Brendan Cummings of the Center for Biological Diversity called the rule “complete doublespeak,” the Associated Press reports.  “It’s saying, ‘Here is a rule necessary for the conservation of the polar bear,’ yet the only thing it does is exempt from regulation the overwhelming threat to the species.”

“If polar bears are to survive we have to directly confront the greatest threat to them: our greenhouse gas emissions,” said Kassie Siegel, director of the Center for Biological Diversity’s Climate Law Institute.

“With their sea-ice habitat rapidly disappearing, polar bears need the full protection of the Endangered Species Act,” said Siegel. “President Obama’s proposal for these magnificent and imperiled animals is a gift to Big Oil and an affirmation of the pro-industry policies of the Bush government. When it comes to saving urgently endangered polar bears, the only ‘change’ Obama has delivered is more climate change.”

The rule, released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, has 60-day public comment period.

* * *

Center for Biological Diversity: Obama Administration Again Proposes Polar Bear Extinction Plan
New Rule Echoes Bush Plan Ignoring Polar Bears’ Plight Against Global Warming

WASHINGTON – April 17 – The Obama administration announced today that it is reissuing a Bush-era regulation that sharply limits protections for polar bears under the Endangered Species Act. Both the current proposal and the previous Bush rule exclude activities occurring outside the range of polar bears — such as the greenhouse gas emissions of industrial polluters like coal plants — from regulations that could help stop the bear’s extinction. Today’s announcement comes as a result of a court order that struck down the Bush rule in October 2011.

Polar bears were the first species added to the endangered and threatened species list solely because of threats from global warming. Regulations issued under the Endangered Species Act must provide for the “conservation” of threatened species. Notably, the press release issued by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announcing the new proposed rule today did not mention greenhouse gases or climate change at all, while the very purpose of the rule is to exempt greenhouse emissions from the reach of the Act.

“If polar bears are to survive we have to directly confront the greatest threat to them: our greenhouse gas emissions,” said Kassie Siegel, director of the Center for Biological Diversity’s Climate Law Institute. “But the Obama administration seems to be living in a fantasy world where the way to solve a difficult problem is to deny its existence.”

The proposed rule severely undermines protection for polar bears by exempting from portions of the Endangered Species Act all activities that occur outside of the bears’ range. But the species is endangered precisely because of activities occurring outside the Arctic — namely the emission of greenhouse gases and resulting warming that is leading to the rapid disappearance of summer sea ice.

“With their sea-ice habitat rapidly disappearing, polar bears need the full protection of the Endangered Species Act,” said Siegel. “President Obama’s proposal for these magnificent and imperiled animals is a gift to Big Oil and an affirmation of the pro-industry policies of the Bush government. When it comes to saving urgently endangered polar bears, the only ‘change’ Obama has delivered is more climate change.”

The special rule also reduces the protections the bear would otherwise receive in Alaska from oil-industry activities in its habitat.

When the polar bear was listed as a threatened species in May 2008 (following a petition by the Center), the Bush administration simultaneously issued a special rule under section 4(d) of the Endangered Species Act. A similar rule was finalized in December 2008 and defended by the Obama administration in court. On Oct. 17, 2011, a federal district court judge struck it down owing to the Fish and Wildlife Service’s failure to conduct an environmental review of the rule’s impacts.

The challenge was brought by the Center for Biological Diversity, Natural Resources Defense Council, Greenpeace and Defenders of Wildlife. Today’s proposal, in response to the 2011 court order, triggers a 60-day public comment period, with the rule scheduled for finalization by the end of 2012.

So I ponder on how to respond to the question from my grandson, currently one-year-old, when, in a few years time, the polar bears are no longer?