Tag: Crater Lake

Picture Parade Two Hundred and Thirty-Seven

Part Two of a pictorial account of our recent trip to Klamath Falls and Crater Lake.

Covering Sunday, 18th March, when we travelled from Klamath Falls up to Crater Lake and then Monday, 19th March, when we returned back from Klamath Falls to Merlin, OR.

Part One of this pictorial account is here.

To Crater Lake – What would the day bring??

oooo

Certainly much snow. In fairness, much of this was from the snow blowers! But still ….

oooo

Roads on the approaches to Crater Lake were ‘interesting’!

oooo

And there is was! Crater Lake in all it’s glory!

oooo

Anyone for a White Christmas – in March!!

oooo

Probably best not to go too close to the edge!

oooo

Then in the blink of an eye it was Monday and the day when we returned home!

Time to go home. Goodbye High Country!

oooo

Who was it that mentioned snow blowers!!

oooo

Back to the familiar and very beautiful sights of home!

oooo

Back to rural tranquility!

The photograph above shows a returning Canadian goose nursing her unborn chicks in their eggs with ‘Dad’ keeping an eye on things close by.

Our beautiful home. A wild flower close to our stable block.

oooo

Andy, me, Jeannie and Trish.

Thanks Trish and Andy for inviting us! Big hugs from Jeannie and me!

What glorious country!

Revelling in the beauty of Crater Lake!

Over the weekend Jean and I went up to Klamath Falls to spend two nights in the company of good friends, Trish and Andy, who live in Tucson, Az.

Last Sunday we all jumped into our car, a GMC Canyon with 4WD, and drove the 60-odd miles from Klamath Falls to the Rim Village Visitor Center.

Talk about impressive!

Here are three photographs that I took that are presented untouched, as in no post processing, that I wanted to share with you.

More details coming along, plus more photos for the next Picture Parade.

The first was taken during Saturday afternoon when Jean and I were on our way to Klamath Falls.

On the road to the high country!

The next photograph was taken when we stopped in one of the many ‘turnouts’ along the highway going up to Crater Lake. In fairness, the high snow bank was more a result of the snow blowers than falling snow … but still!

Rumour has it that it had snowed in these parts!

This last photograph, for today anyway, is the sight of Crater Lake!

What an incredible landscape!

P.S. Happy Birthday, dear Morten!

Oregon

A dip into this remarkable State.

Just fancied a change from two days of Democratic Deficit. So today’s post is a brief overview of the US State that Jean and I live in, together with our animals, the State of Oregon.

Now it’s easy to look up a Wikipedia reference to Oregon but what really caught my eye was as a result of a recent visit to the local Grants Pass office of the Bureau of Land Management.  We had gone there to purchase a $5 permit that allows us to go on to BLM land and harvest our own Christmas Tree!

In the Grants Pass office were a number of brochures of scenic attractions in Oregon and we picked up one describing the Rogue-Umpqua National Scenic Byway.  Just a quick browse reminded us of Oregon’s stunning and dramatic scenery. Just wanted to share some images.

Mount Thielsen

Mt. Thielsen
Mt. Thielsen

The Mount Thielsen trail is described here.

Crater Lake

At a depth of 1,932 feet Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States.  It was formed more than 7,500 years ago when the Mount Mazama volcano erupted and then collapsed back in on itself.

Crater Lake showing Wizard Island.
Crater Lake showing Wizard Island.

As Wikipedia describes the lake,

The lake partly fills a nearly 2,148-foot (655 m)-deep caldera[1] that was formed around 7,700 (± 150) years ago[2] by the collapse of the volcano Mount Mazama. Human interaction is traceable back to the indigenous Native Americans witnessing the eruption of Mount Mazama. There are no rivers flowing into or out of the lake; the evaporation is compensated for by rain and snowfall at a rate such that the total amount of water is replaced every 250 years. At 1,943 feet (592 m), the lake is the deepest in the United States, and the seventh[3] or ninth deepest in the world, depending on whether average or maximum depth is measured.[4]

Watson Falls

The base of Watson Falls.
The base of Watson Falls.

The website EveryTrail describes Watson Falls:

Watson Falls is the third highest waterfall in Oregon at 272 feet. It is the most beautiful waterfall along the North Umpqua River Valley. You will cross a wooden bridge below the falls that will put you right into the lower rapids with an amazing view of the falls as they roar over the basalt lava cliffs ahead.

Someone who goes under the handle of HikingTheWest posted this video on YouTube about 6 weeks ago.

Oregon Caves

These caves are an Oregon National Monument with full details on the US National Park Service’s website.  That website explains:

Nestled deep inside the Siskiyou Mountains, the caves formed as rainwater from the ancient forest above dissolved the surrounding marble and created one of the world’s few marble caves. The highly complex geology found on the Monument contributes to the unusual and rare plants and animals found nowhere else but here.

A view of the inside of the caves.
A view of the inside of the caves.

There are many good videos of the Oregon Caves on YouTube so do have a browse if you want to.  This one caught my eye, especially as it was filmed in January, 2013..

Rogue River

The Rogue River
The Rogue River

Final sight for today, the Rogue River runs close by Grants Pass, our nearest town to where we live.  Again there is a Wikipedia entry from which one learns that, “Although the Rogue Valley near Medford is partly urban, the average population density of the Rogue watershed is only about five people per square mile (12 per km2).”

Just reflecting on that last paragraph, a simple calculation reveals that the State of Oregon has a population of around 3.9 million people with an land area of 98,300 square miles.  Thus the population density of Oregon is 39.6 persons per square mile.  To put that into perspective, our neighbouring Californians to the South enjoy a population density of 238 persons per square mile!

Jean and I are very lucky to be living in such a beautiful part of Southern Oregon.