Pedi has diabetes!

A visit to the vet on Tuesday confirmed it.

In recent weeks Pedi, one of our two smaller dogs, ergo Sweeny and Pedi, was peeing without control and drinking lots of water to go with it.

We rang Jim last week, who used to be our neighbour but they then moved to Roseburg, who is a veterinary doctor and he thought it likely when he heard the symptoms that it was diabetes. We had an appointment with Lincoln Road Veterinary Clinic on Tuesday.

At Lincoln Road Veterinary Clinic, we believe pets are a part of the family. Our teamwork philosophy strives to provide the best choices for your pet by keeping you informed of treatment options and recommendations. Our team of skilled professionals apply advanced diagnostic and treatment techniques to provide the best medical and surgical care available for your pet.

Our office is conveniently located on the west edge of Grants Pass in a warm and inviting country setting. We have a dog park so your furry friends can exercise and play!

We were seen by Dr. Karen who also thought that was the case. She took a blood sample and then rang us at home about 2 hours later to confirm.

That gave us enough time to go back into town and to the Walmart pharmacy to purchase the insulin and the needles.

We were under clear instructions from Dr. Karen to inject Pedi with insulin 30 minutes after food and to give him food every 12 hours. We chose to feed Pedi at 04:30 and 16:30 local time every day and then give him his injection at 05:00 and 17:00.

We have an appointment next Wednesday morning, the 9th, to confirm that Pedi is on the ‘right track’. Having insulin injections will be Pedi’s routine for the rest of his life.

The American Kennel Club have quite a long piece on diabetes in dogs, from which I quote:

Treatment of Diabetes in Dogs

  • Diet. Your veterinarian will recommend the best type of diet for your diabetic dog. Usually this will include some good-quality protein, as well as fiber and complex carbohydrates that will help to slow absorption of glucose. Your vet may also recommend a diet with relatively low fat content.
  • Exercise. To help avoid sudden spikes or drops in glucose levels, it is especially important that diabetic dogs maintain a moderate but consistent exercise routine.
  • Injections. Most diabetic dogs will require daily shots of insulin under the skin, something that the owner will have to learn to do. Although it’s understandable to be apprehensive about doing this, it’s not as hard as it might sound. It can become a quick and easy daily routine that isn’t traumatic at all for either dog or owner.

This is a photograph that I took of Pedi yesterday.

He really is not aware of the disease.

It’s up to Jean and me to administer the insulin and keep him happy!

16 thoughts on “Pedi has diabetes!

  1. I know this routine very well. My Lab, Melanie had diabetes. I had to administer shots to her on a daily basis as well. It became a routine and she was blissfully unaware.

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    1. Thank you, Sue. It all seems to be on the up and up. In the sense that Pedi is now being given insulin twice a day and that he has settled down to the new routine. Pedi is drinking much less water and not peeing without control. So it is a week tomorrow since we saw Dr. Karen and also we are being greatly helped, informally, by Jim Goodbrod who is a friend and he is also a veterinary doctor.

      Liked by 1 person

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