Tag: Jimena de la Frontera

Day Seven of Tom and Chica’s walk.

I’m republishing three in three days!

I want to get further ahead in the story of this walk and I get the very clear impression that you are in agreement with this.

My readership numbers have been high and there have been no negative responses to the generous offer from Tom and his wife to republish Tom’s long and interesting walk along the Spanish pathway GR7.

So on we go!

ooOOoo

Day 7: Jimena de la Frontera to Cerra de la Fantasia 20k

By Tom and Chica, 22nd January, 2020

Written by Tom’s wife.

The last two days were non-walking days, one for bad weather and another to move base again. Now we have the luxury of being in a house for a while in Jimera de Libar, a village we know well.

So the day started with the drive back to Jimena and the weather looked reasonable. Again, Merlin refused to be left so the three of them set off up the path, climbing steadily for the first hour and a half.

Climbing path.
Spanish Fir / Pinsapo (Abies Pinsapo) in the background

The path eventually levelled out and passed beneath the rocky outcrops of the Altos de Paneron and Cerro de Marin. After a bare rocky sections where the route was harder to determine, they went into dense forest of oak and Spanish fir (we love these and call them lollipop trees because of their shape). Both dogs in great form, but Tom was mean and moody :).

Dark clouds were gathering from all directions but the view to the coast was still impressive. However, it wasn’t long before the rain began and the temperature dropped.

Looking south – you can just see the sea.

Fortunately the rest of the route was on a well-defined and signposted track, winding down through the cork oaks in the midst of the Los Alcornacales. It was here deep in the forest that I eventually picked them up. I had forgotten that smaller Spanish roads aren’t always roads as I know them and the last five and a half miles I was driving along a rough track with no mobile signal, not at all sure I was in the right place. Even though we have a 4×4, I made very slow progress and it was with considerable relief that I found them, damp but completely unconcerned.

ooOOoo

I wonder why Tom felt “mean and moody”? Gilliwolfe doesn’t say.

But it is still a most fascinating walk.

Day Six of Tom and Chica’s walk

The walking tour of Spain continues!

Once more I will keep my introduction very short. Except to say that the original was here.

It’s turning into a fabulous walk!

ooOOoo

Day 6: Castillo de Castellar to Jimena de la Frontera 22k

By Tom and Chica, 18th January, 2020

Written by Tom’s wife.

Today was the longest walk so far and didn’t actually start until late as we decided to shift base. By the time we had the caravan installed on a site in Jimena de la Frontera and I’d driven Tom and Chica back to Castillar it was 2pm. Chica was obviously refreshed after her day off and keen to go. Castillar again looked amazing and it was great to know the start is downhill on a tarmac path through more lovely woodland.

As it levelled out, the tarmac gave way to a gravel track through scrub and grazing land occupied mainly by local brown retinto beef cattle. A huge old farmhouse had seen better days and seemed unoccupied, at least by humans. The scenery changed again as they entered the first cultivated area they had come across since the start. No idea what the crop is though.

The route met up with the railway track and would stay with it all the way to Jimena. There was a pony grazing here. Despite having a rug and being quite friendly, the white hairs on its nose indicate it has been put in a seraton – a noseband with spikes that dig into the soft flesh of the muzzle. These are still used a lot in Spain. Nearby there was a donkey that was hobbled – which is now illegal. Equines get a rough deal here sometimes.

A grand entrance

There were a few dwellings as they approached Jimena – one with a very impressive gate. The shell motif is associated with St James and is a common one on caminos (pilgrim trails) although more usually found on the famous Santiago de Compostela in northern Spain.

The light was fading fast and the last hour or so was done in virtual darkness with Jimena castle luminations acting as beacon to the weary traveller.

ooOOoo

Wonderful. And what a lovely job of writing it all up.

Keep it coming, Mrs. Tom.