The continuing GR7 journey

Where does the time go!

It is now ten days since I last reported on Tom and Chica’s great walk; so much for my couple of postings a week!

But they continue to walk the GR7 path in Spain and I will continue to republish their posts of this great trip.

So now, so far as republishing goes, we are up to Day Two.

ooOOoo

Day 2: La Pena to Embalse de Almodovar 16k

By Tom and Chica, 13th January, 2020

Written by Tom’s wife.

Human breakfast!

All walking days will start with the full monty for Tom. He is a very practiced breakfast chef so I leave him to it. It did seems to take a while this morning so I think we may have to start getting up a bit earlier. For this week, at least, I will be dropping him off and picking him up so he doesn’t have to carry the full pack with the tent etc, giving him time to get some fitness back first after the flu virus.

The start

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So it was 10am before we got to the start at La Pena (What Three Words location: crafted.indecisive.barbecued.) and already a really glorious day; full sun and a gentle breeze. The route wound up into the hills giving wonderful views back down to the sea and across to the Moroccan coast. The path continued on a variety of surfaces, some tarmac, some sand and some stony tracks. The latter proved a bit uncomfortable and Tom now thinks that his more sturdy boots might be better, despite being a bit heavier. He has metal rods in both his feet, the result of a climbing accident about twenty years ago. So it’s extra important that his feet are well supported.

Goats on the move
Very spiny cactus with fruit – name anyone?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The landscape was quite rocky with olive and other hardy shrubs and trees, and lots of cacti too. Not much wildlife spotted but plenty of goats with their melodic bells. The route ended at a large lake on a inaccessible track so they walked back to the road where we met, conveniently close to a bar for a much appreciated cold beer (for Tom)and long drink of water (for Chica).

Meanwhile, back at the campsite, there was a minor crisis as a neighbour discovered a number of processionary caterpillars. These are nasty critters with highly irritant hairs that can cause a painful rash in humans but are even more dangerous for dogs. As the name suggests, the caterpillars form a chain when they move and, of course, most dogs want to investigate but if they ingest the hairs it can cause real problems. The nests can easily be spotted as dense webs on the tips of pine branches. The site maintenance staff were very prompt in coming along to remove the nests but we will remain vigilant. It was probably a bit daft to choose a plot under the pines and it’s a lesson learned for the future. One of many to come, no doubt.

 

 

ooOOoo

This is such an amazing trip. Words hardly express my admiration for what Tom.

And, as before, please do follow Tom and Chica directly.

12 thoughts on “The continuing GR7 journey

  1. Nice trip, Paul.
    Those caterpillars are really bad for both small animals and humans. They shoot their needles against everything, they think might be a threat to them. Only one needle contain so much poison, that small dogs and cats can loose their life by this. Others to become very sick after being hit.

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      1. I believe so Paul. We have so many of them here in Spain. They have given me many challenges through my years here, when I have been walking with Odin. As caterpillars they are dangerous, but when they become to insects, there are no danger any longer.
        The problem is, that they leave the trees in lines and walk against natural areas, where they can transform themselves. When they walk, they might be hundreds a time and difficult to avoid totally, as there are many pine trees here.

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