Picture Parade Two Hundred and Sixty

A few of the world’s largest breeds.

The Great Dane

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The Neapolitan mastiff

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The Scottish Deerhound

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Dogue de Bordeaux

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More next week!

16 thoughts on “Picture Parade Two Hundred and Sixty

      1. No. The fact that they don’t live very long & also because of renting houses. However, that doesn’t mean in the future I won’t have one.

  1. When I was very small, I was terrified of a Great Diane that was loose near my Grandma’s house. I was unaware then, that dogs were attracted to me and wanted to be friends. I thought they wanted to hurt me. Not true, but when you could fit underneath a large unknown dog running towards you with ears flapping, I think you might have a moment of trepidation too!
    Now, I think Great Danes are majestic and beautiful.

    I do have to admit though, not every large dog is friendly. I was house sitting a beautiful Weimaraner and out on a walk with her. The local Spanish Tennis club had guard dogs. One of them absolutely hated my charge and would go mad at the Fence, trying to attack her. On this particular day… He was out, and roaming free on the street. I spotted him early and turned up the street away from him. The Weimaraner was confused (she liked her routine), but came along. Unfortunately before I could get her out of sight, the guard dog spotted her. He was a huge mastiff and much larger than either of us. Unfortunately, I had picked a dead end street with an empty house plot at the end.
    The face off was scary. The mastiff came with growls, wild eyes and frothing mouth. The Weimaraner pulled, but somehow, I got her behind me and faced the monster threatening us both. I don’t know much Spanish, but managed to firmly say. “PERO, NO!” and I held my hand up in a policeman like stop. The beast did stop and circled while I circled too keeping the Weimaraner firmly behind me away from him. Then, as he contemplated what to do next. I backed up with the Weimaraner, all the while keeping my eyes on him. When we were about 10 meters away. I turned to leave. I would not let the Weimaraner interact with him. It worked, and we escaped. That sounded easy. It wasn’t. I was really scared but tried not to show it. I phoned the owners to say that the Mastiff was out. They were horrified (knowing what the dog was capable of). They in turn (despite being on holiday) called the Tennis club to tell them the Mastiff was on the loose.

    It isn’t the dog that is the problem. It is always the people who train them.

    1. I love Great Danes. I fully understand the fear that size can instill. When I decided to get one, I drove to my friends house who raised them. While sitting my truck(Ford Ranger) the dogs head came head level to the open window. It was a little unnerving. But once I got use to the breed they are gentle giants that are really just big clowns.

    2. Always the same issue with dogs. If you want to find the cause of bad behavior then look to the human who trained said dog. A lovely reply from you, Colette, thank you!

  2. As I was telling Colette, Danes are an awesome breed. I wish I had discovered them when I was younger and had less agility issues. And I fully agree with her statement, regardless of size, how a dog behaves is owner controlled, even with the aggressive breeds. You properly train and understand the capabilities so that the owner can protect others who don’t understand. Dittims is pictured on my page and the main character of the book I am trying to publish.

    1. I wish I was younger too Anita. I can no longer take big dogs for walks as I just can’t keep up with them, especially on steep hills. Great Danes act a lot like their smaller look alikes, Weimaraners and Visslers. 😁

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